Picking Precious Pumpkin Memories

Last Sunday was a beautiful autumn day, so I decided to take Georgia to pick her first pumpkin. Although she is too young to understand the experience, getting outside and breathing in the fresh, autumn air would be a blessing to both of us. We were going with a long time friend of mine and had decided to go to Harvest Hill in Seymour, WI. Harvest Hill is know for their great pumpkin patch, corn maze, craft shop, and a large variety of activites and games that are fun for the whole family.

One of the great activities at Harvest Hill is the quaint, little petting zoo. Goat kids, a donkey, a pony, and various barnyard birds call the petting zoo home through the harvest season. Georgia and I got up close and personal with a few of these critters. Although Georgia is still too young to play with the animals, she did get joy out of their shaggy appearances. It seems they may have gotten some joy out of the spectacle of her knit cow hat as well.

Georgia and I got to meet this peppered pygmy goat!

Once we had our fill of the petting zoo, we made our way to the craft shed. Here, we found an assortment of fall decor, clothing, and autumn treats to enjoy while at the farm. The aroma of hot, fresh popcorn and warm apple cider tempted our senses as we walked in and perused the selection of home made wreaths, ladders, and rustic decor. At the other end of the shed, excited children wielding paint brushes demonstrated their artistic abilities as they customized the pumpkins they had picked. Speaking of, we still needed to get our pumpkin.

Upon leaving the craft shed, we walked past the children’s activity area. Here, children were playing autumn themed games organized by Harvest Hill. Georgia is still a hip attatchment at this time so we kept moving to the pumkin patch. At the patch, we quickly noticed the large variety of pumkins one could pick. Pumpkins of all sizes were available in red, white, and orange. Without much deliberation, we settled on a small white pumpkin and snapped the stem off about 3 inches from the top of the gourd. More time could have been spent finding the perfect pick, but a cold breeze began to blow and Georgia needed to get back to the calming warmth of the car. As we left the patch, we stopped back in the craft shed to pay for our pumpkin and made our leave. As I placed Georgia in her car seat, she began to nod off. By the time I had walked around the car and climbed in, she was asleep.

Taking my baby to Harvest Hill last weekend filled us with fall spirit. The excitement of the day was enough to put Georgia to sleep for the extent of the trip home. I on the other hand, had gotten a taste of fall festivities that gave me the urge to light pumpkin, apple, and autumn breeze candles throughout the house as soon as I got home. Harvest Hill was a great place to make precious memories with my daughter and I am patiently awaiting taking her back next year so we can wander the corn maze, paint a pumpkin, or play any of the many games for children that the farm offers.

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